Food labelling e-learning course
Nutrition claims

Nutrition claims

Low fat reduced sugar

Nutrition claims say something about the level of a nutrient in a food in a way that implies it is beneficial. These claims and associated conditions are in a list at the end of the Regulation and are the only permitted nutrition claims.

Examples of permitted nutrition claims and associated conditions follow.

'high fibre'

A claim that a food is high in fibre, and any claim likely to have the same meaning for the consumer, may only be made where the product contains at least 6g of fibre per 100g or at least 3g of fibre per 100 kcal.

'fat-free'

A claim that a food is fat-free, and any claim likely to have the same meaning for the consumer, may only be made where the product contains no more than 0.5g of fat per 100g or 100ml. However, claims expressed as 'X% fat-free' shall be prohibited.

Vitamin and mineral claims

The conditions for vitamin and mineral claims are based on how much of the nutrient a product contains compared to 'significant amounts', as referred to in the FIC. The FIC states that, generally speaking, what constitutes a 'significant amount' should consider:

  • For single portion food and drinks: 15% of the nutrient reference value of the nutrient in that single portion.
  • Otherwise, 15% of the nutrient reference value in 100g/100ml of foods and 7.5% of the nutrient reference value in 100ml of drinks.

These nutrient reference values are also given in the FIC, e.g. 2.5µg for vitamin B12 and 3.5mg for fluoride.

Comparative claims

Comparative claims (such as 'reduced', 'increased' or 'light') are slightly different: control is based on the extent of the difference in nutrient content between the product making the claim and similar products. The extent of the difference must be stated in the product's labelling and must be at least 30% for most nutrients, but only 25% for 'reduced sodium' or 'reduced salt' and only 10% of the nutrient reference values for reduced vitamin or mineral claims.